Adam Liaw’s Lemon Chicken!!

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Yay! finally have the computer back!

When I was little and we went out for a special dinner it was always Chinese food. Especially if I went out with my Grandparents. As I got older we started to expand our taste in Asian foods (probably as more became available) to Thai, Japanese, Malaysian Korean etc.

When I say Chinese, I mean Westernized Cantonese food which is prolific in Australia, in every shopping center food court and local take away shop. Things like lemon and honey chicken, special  fried rice, fried dim sims and sweet and sour pork.

We now have really high quality Cantonese and other regional Chinese food available, but sometimes, I still crave my lemon chicken and special fried rice. I got some the other day from the local take away. It was a DISAPPOINTMENT! The chicken was dry and the sauce tasted like lemon cordial. Yuk. I wasted so many calories!

Then I was flicking through the July issue of the Australian Women Weekly and it featured a lemon chicken recipe by Adam Liaw (winner of the of second series of Australian Master Chef). So I had a go at making my own. It was YUMMY. I was a scared of frying at home, I usually avoid it, but the chicken was tender and crisp! The sauce was beautifully lemony and balanced! Give it a go…

Ingredients:

400g Chicken breast

2 egg whites

oil of choice, to shallow fry

1/2 cup of corn flour ( he recommends water-chestnut flour if you can get it)

white rice to serve

Marinade

1 tbs of light soy sauce

1/4 tsp of sesame oil

1/4 tsp of sea salt flakes

1 tbs of Shaoxiang wine (Chinese cooking wine, it you can’t find this use dry sherry)

Lemon Sauce

1/4 cup of caster sugar

1/4 cup of white vinegar

zest and juice of one lemon

1/2 cup of chicken stock

2 tsp of cornflour or arrowroot

1 small julienned carrot

3 green onions, julienned

Steps.

1. Combine all marinade ingredients in a shallow dish.

2. Between two sheets of plastic wrap, beat chicken softly to a uniform thickness of 1.5 to 2 cm. Place in dish with marinade, coat well and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

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3. Heat 2 cm of oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Beat the egg whites until fluid and frothy. Dip chicken in egg white, then into flour. Fry for 3 -4 minutes or until golden. Turn and fry for a further 3 minutes or until brown and cooked through. Drain chicken on paper towel. Repeat with remaining chicken, be careful not to over crowd the pan, as this will drop the temperature and result in soggy oily chicken.

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Sauce

Combine sugar, vinegar, zest, juice and stock in a pot over  medium heat. Bring to a simmer stirring, to dissolve sugar. Mix the arrowroot or corn flour with a little cold water and stir into the sauce. Cook stirring for about one minute, or until clear and glossy. Add the carrot and onion, cook to 30 secs to soften.

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To Serve

Slice chicken into 2.5 cm strips. Arrange on plate, scatter with some chopped green onion, serve with rice and sauce.

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Txx

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Walpeup Young Womens Fellowship recipes – Chocolate Pudding

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This post is dedicated to my maternal grandmothers family. They were farmers in the small town of Walpeup. This recipe book was published by the ‘Walpeup Young Womens Fellowship’.

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The recipes are attributed to many of my great aunties, second and third cousins and various other family members related to me by marriage. This kinds of recipes books were made for school, club, association etc. fund raising purposes. But they were really useful when there was no internet, no cooking shows and no bookshops around the corner (cookbooks were expensive anyway). They were full of family recipes.

The recipes are for lack of a better work, very ‘retro’. They feature lots of canned things like soups and pineapple, call soy sauce ‘soya sauce’, and are by their nature budget friendly.

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But these things reflect what it was like to live in a rural area in the 70’s here in Australia. There was no supermarket in the town, they had a small store, a butcher  and a  cafe (many towns may not have had, even this). They were 1 hours drive from  the next larger town and small supermarket, and even then, this town would not have had specially stores.

You ate seasonally, because things out of season where simply not available. Sometimes things had to be made from pantry ingredients and whatever was growing in the garden, you couldn’t just run and get something from the supermarket at 7:00pm.  There was no take away, not even a fish and chip shop (which are and where everywhere in Australia). Meat was expensive, so cheaper cuts were utilized and nothing was wasted. Sundays roast became  sandwiches, curry, patties, and fritters during the week (my Nana still makes the fritters, there are pretty good with lots of sauce).

Anyway some of these recipes are still made by the original ladies and their descendents, and some thankfully have been retired.

This a pudding contributed to the recipe collection by my second cousin Tracy, I learnt how to make when I was fairly young, maybe 11. My Nana made it, so did my mum and dad (and many of my cousins), and now I make it too.

It is a chocolate self -saucing pudding.  Here is the original recipe.

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Here is my updated recipe. I used wholemeal flour and buttermilk, as this is what I had, feel free to use normal flour and milk. Using the brown sugar makes a really fudgey sauce.

Ingredients:

1 1/4 cup of wholemeal S.R. flour

1/2 cup of white sugar

2 tbls of cocoa

pinch of salt

2 tbs of melted butter

3/4 cup of buttermilk

1 egg, beaten

1/4 dark chocolate chips

topping

1/2 cup of white sugar

1/2 cup of dark brown sugar

2tbs of cocoa

1 1/2 cups of boiling water

Preheat oven to 180c.

1.In a bowl, mix  flour, sugar, cocoa, chocolate chips and salt.

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2.Add butter, milk and egg. Stir to combined.

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3. Spread into a greased deep pie dish, small casserole  or oven proof skillet.

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4. To make topping, mix together remaining sugars and cocoa, sprinkle over the top the batter.

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5. Careful pour over the boiling water.

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6. Bake for approx. 30 mins.

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You should have a cake the has risen to the the top, and a  chocolate sauce on the bottom, that is bubbling deliciously up the sides of you dish.

A recipe that has stood the test of time X.

Zumbo Chocolate Mirror Cake Mix

ImageYes, I use cake mixes sometimes!

Really they are not much easier than making a cake from scratch, but some are pretty good!

In Australia, over the last couple of years two ‘celebrity chefs’ Adriano Zumbo and Donna Hay have released their own ‘premium’ cake, biscuit and slice recipes.

This is one of Zumbo’s. He is a pâtissier and is known for ‘out there’ creations and providing Australian Master Chef with some outrageous challenges.

He provides videos that are good for the recipe instructions, at http://zumbobaking.com.au/

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I cake was relatively easy to make. You have to use a water bath, which may be a little intimating for an inexperienced cook.

My cake stuck in the corners to the pan, but I think I was lazy with the greasing!

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So the chunks missing ruined the mirror effect somewhat, but as you can see the glaze is super shiny and luscious looking.

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I served the cake as part of a dessert spread at a party, soon after applying the glaze. I left it on the board, as in the picture above. However, to make it look like the box, you are supposed to let it sit  awhile and then remove to another serving plate to, get rid of the excess at the sides. It was very popular, I think because the glaze was still warm!

Tx.

Homemade chocolate pudding or yogo or blancmange….

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This is an American style chocolate pudding, however my Nana calls it a blancmange and it’s similar to chilled dairy desserts available here in Australia, such as Yogo.

This is a low cal version  (1% milk, sugar alternative), that will give you a chocolate, creamy sweet hit!

However, feel free to play with it. For Yogo, leave out the dark chocolate, and use a little less cocoa to get a lighter color.  Use real sugar, and add more chocolate! Or ever better make a decant dessert by replacing some milk with cream and melting Nutella through it!

For Aussie’s with kids, replace the cocoa with Milo, and make a homemade version of those Milo dairy snacks at the supermarket.

You could also add more vanilla for a vanilla flavor, or some other flavored powdered drinks for strawberry, caramel etc.

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Ingredients for 4 small serves

2 cups of 1% milk (or milk of your choice)

3 tbs of cornflour

3 tbs of cocoa (this makes it very chocolatey, use less if you like)

4 squares of 70% cocoa dark chocolate

half a tsp of vanilla essence

2 tbs of powered steevia (use sweetener of you choice and adjust to taste)

Nuts or toasted coconut to top if you like

  1. Put milk and chocolate in a saucepan on low heat, stir until chocolate is melted.
  2. Once melted shift in flour and cocoa, while stirring to prevent lumps, add vanilla.
  3. Increase heat to medium and stir continually, until thick. Be careful it does not catch on the bottom of the pan.
  4. Pour into containers, add any toppings.
  5. Refrigerate until cold, or eat hot like a custard.

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Using the Breville – Chicken and Pecan Jaffle

Lately we have been making Jaffles quite a lot. Once we take the maker out we use it, but once it gets put away in the cupboard, we forget about for a few months!

It makes a toasted sandwich a little bit special and allows you use some interesting ingredients. Most often we have bacon and egg or classic ham and cheese, but the other day I used left over grilled chicken, sweet potato mash, a few green bean beans and some cheese -left over chicken dinner jaffle, pretty yummy!

It seems jaffles are getting trendy, I saw a segment on the TV show (Everyday Gourmet, Channel 10 in Australia), that featured an owner of a jaffle food truck in Sydney (Jafe Jaffles), he made a sweet jaffle using pastry and then a poached chicken, almond and basil Jaffle,which has inspired the following:

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Ingredients for 2 Jaffles

quarter of finely diced red onion

about 8 pecans coarsely chopped

1 breast of a roasted chicken (or poached)

1 – 2 tbsp  finely chopped parsley (or herb of your choice)

1 tbsp of good whole egg mayonnaise

4 slices of bread of your choice

butter or fat of your choice

  1. Turn on Breville.
  2. Combine onion, pecans, chicken parsley and mayonnaise in a bowl, season.
  3. Butter all slices of bread on one side.
  4. When Breville is ready, place bread buttered side down, evenly spread chicken mixture over bread and top with remaining slices.
  5. Close Breville and toast until done!

It was a yummy sandwich, better than cheese and ham. You could go without the butter, but it  creates a nice brown crust on the outside of the sandwich.

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